This is a default image banner.

 

Chair:  Dr. Betty Dickson
Phone:
(501) 370-5286 or (501) 370-5248
Email:  bdickson
@philander.edu
Location: Titus Academic Center, Suite C - Room 218

Division of Education

Mission of the Division of Education

The mission of the Division of Education is consistent with the mission of Philander Smith College. The Division of Education builds upon the College’s philosophy as well as human, physical, and financial resources for the implementation of its programs and services. Further, the Division is committed to providing outstanding educators who will become community, national, and world leaders committed to life-long learning. Education candidates are prepared for both school and non-school settings. Each program is designed to foster positive change that leads to an imp roved quality of life for students, their families, the community, and the global society.

Conceptual Framework



The theme of the conceptual framework f or the program is “The Teacher as the FORCE in the Teaching/ Learning Process.” The framework’s underlying principles are: Facilitator, Organizer, Reflector, Collaborator, and Energizer. Each principle is alined with Pathwise four domains, Arkansas Standards, and professional standards.

 

 

Teacher Education Programs

The Division of Education offers Teacher Education licensure programs in Early Childhood Education (ECED) ( grades P-4), Middle Childhood Education Generalist  (MCEA) (grades 4-8) (candidates must choose one of two concentrations: either  English/Language Arts/Social Studies or Math/Science), Vocational Education/Business Technology (VOBT) (grades 7-12) and a non-licensure program in Physical Education (PHED). Each program is built upon a sound liberal arts foundation, an appropriate content area foundation, and is designed to enable candidates to acquire, knowledge, skills, and dispositions that are crucial to effective teaching .

 

All education majors interested in pursuing a Teacher Education Degree leading to licensure must meet Philander Smith College graduation and Arkansas Licensure requirements.

 

Admission to the Teacher Education Program

Admission to the College does not automatically admit the education major to the Teacher Education Program. Education majors must meet the following published guidelines for each program. 

Click here to read the NCATE 2012 Accreditation Report



(See detailed information below faculty listings)


Faculty/Academic Advisors

Betty Dickson, Ed.D., Chair
Professor of Education
Suite C, Rm. 217
(501) 370-5237



Dr. Betty Dickson received her Doctorate of Education from the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville in May of 1989.  Prior to earning her doctorate, with an emphasis in Reading/Early Childhood Education, Dr. Dickson earned a Master of Education in Elementary Education from the University of Arkansas and a Bachelor of Science degree in Elementary Education from the University of Arkansas in Pine Bluff (formerly AM & N). 

Dr. Dickson spent the first 14 years of her career as an elementary/early childhood school teacher in the public school systems in Wabbaseka, Pine Bluff, and Little Rock, Arkansas.  While writing her dissertation on the impact of magnet schools, Dr. Dickson worked as an Early Childhood Curriculum Coordinator at Williams Magnet School.  This presented her with an opportunity to directly observe the effectiveness of a magnet school in comparison to a traditional elementary school.  Her first position in higher education was at the University of Central Arkansas (UCA) in Conway.  There she taught courses such as Principles and Practices of Teaching Reading, Reading in the Content, and Children's Literature to undergraduate and graduate students.  Dr. Dickson also served as an Adjunct Professor at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock before joining Philander Smith College. 

While at Philander Smith College, Dr. Dickson has served as an Associate Professor, Interim Division Chair, and is now a Professor and Coordinator of Early Childhood Education within the Division of Education.  Throughout her career, Dr. Dickson has presented at local, state, national, and international conferences, published articles, and secured grants for Philander Smith College.  Her tireless contributions to the field of education have prepared hundreds of future teachers to lead our country's youth.


Lloyd Hervey, Ed.D.
Assistant Professor of Education
Suite C, Rm. 214
(501) 370-5239



Dr. Lloyd Hervey I is a 1968 graduate of Philander Smith College.  Dr. Hervey holds a Master of Science in Education degree in Elementary Education  from the university of Central Arkansas in Conway, Arkansas and a Doctorate in Instruction and Curriculum Leadership with an emphasis in Elementary Education from the University of Memphis in Memphis, Tennessee.  Dr. Hervey's teaching experience spans a period of thirty years as a public school teacher, having taught 4 year-olds, fifth and sixth grades, and facilitating a middle school gifted program.  In addition, he has nine years of experience as an Assistant Professor of Education at the University of Central Arkansas and Philander Smith College. 

Dr. Hervey is published having co-authored an article for a reading journal and as a contributor of a chapter on diversity for an introduction to education text.  He has made several educational presentations at the state, national, and international levels.  His primary research interest is the integration of learning styles, theory, and multiple intelligence as a means of accommodating the academic needs of diverse student populations. 
 

 

Annie Winkler Williams, Ed.D.
Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs
NCATE Coordinator/Accreditation Director
M.L. Titus Bldg., Rm. AC-232
(501) 370-5311


 Dr. Williams coordinates the Vocational Education/Business Technology Program (secondary level, grades 7-12).  Additionally, she serves as coordinator for the division’s National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) re-accreditation.

 

Melanie Kennon, Ed.D.
Assistant Professor of Education
Field Experience Coordinator
Suite C, Rm. 215
(501) 370-5322



Dr. Melanie J. Kennon has over 25 years experience in teaching, curriculum design and development, strategic leadership training, and mentoring, in a variety of venues. She has worked for Fortune 500 companies as well as the Arkansas Department of Education and three Arkansas universities to design, coordinate, and implement professional and leadership development programs. From her early beginnings in the field of education as a first grade teacher to her time at the Arkansas Department of Education and at various universities across the state, Dr. Kennon has remained true to her calling as a teacher.  She is a consummate life long learner who likes to be challenged and to learn new things, and to share that knowledge with others. She has a great affection for young children and believes that the impact that early childhood teachers have on the children in their classrooms has life-long lasting effects, so we better get it right! She believes that teacher quality is strongly correlated with student achievement,  and continues to contribute to  teacher quality in the state through her interactions with the students in the teacher education program at Philander Smith College. 

She currently serves as Field Experience Coordinator and Assistant Professor in the Division of Education.  Her state-wide credits include implementation of the PATHWISE Mentoring Program for novice teachers and the Praxis III Performance Assessment for initial licensure in the state of Arkansas. She is currently researching the development of effective teacher dispositions in pre-service candidates. Her other research interests include strategies for forming proactive partnerships with parents of those students having learning disabilities or ADHD, behavior guidance techniques that enrich the self esteem of young children, as well as development of inexpensive learning centers in early childhood classrooms. Dr. Kennon has frequently provided professional development training for a number of early childhood centers and professional groups.

Dr. Kennon holds a B.A. in Psychology from Rhodes College, an M.Ed from University of Arkansas-Little Rock, and an Ed.D in Instruction and Curriculum Leadership from University of Memphis, graduating Magna Cum Laude.  She is an active member of the National Association for the Education of Young Children, the Human Resource Management Association, the American Society for Training and Development, and has served on the Parent’s Board of Directors at University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.  Dr. Kennon has been active over the last 5 years in working with the residents of the Dorcas House and Women and Children First shelters for battered women, teaching them goal setting, resume and interviewing skills, and positive self-messages.

 

In her spare time, Dr. Kennon’s interests expand to the field of human resource management and organizational development. Melanie is a Certified Facilitator for DDI (Developmental Dimensions International) and Franklin-Covey time management and leadership development.  She is President of Kennon & Associates Consulting, LLC, a people development company that specializes in human resource and customized training and development services. Melanie specializes in such areas as executive coaching, team building, organizational development, communication skills, time management, and human resource solutions. She serves as a quarterly guest writer for City and Town Magazine on leadership and organizational management issues. Dr. Kennon also enjoys music, reading, cooking, gardening, and most of all, playing with her grandson, Owen!



Anton McKinney, Jr. 
Assistant Professor of Health and Physical Education
Mims Gym, PE 220
(501) 370-5339

 

Coach Anton McKinney is Assistant Professor of Physical Education and Assistant Men’s Basketball Coach at Philander Smith College. He teaches Theory and Practice of Basketball, Physical Motor Skills, and Racketball. He is also an expert the Organization and Administration of Physical Education as well as Coaching and Officiating.  

 

Coach McKinney earned his degree in Public Relations from Drury University in 2004. As a member of the Panther Basketball Team, he helped lead the team to the 2004 Heartland Conference Championship. The Panthers finished the season with a 24-8 record, advancing to the NCAA Division II Region finals.

From 2006-2008, he attended Henderson State University, where he receive a M.S of Science in Sports Administration and served as Assistant Basketball Coach.  His duties included scouting, recruiting, day to day operations, and overseeing athletes’ daily activities.

Prior to his two seasons at Drury, Coach McKinney played two seasons at Three Rivers Community College where he was an All-Conference selection.

As a 2000 graduate of Kennett High School, McKinney was a three sport athlete lettering in basketball, football, and track. He earned All State, All-District, All-Region, and All-Conference honors.

He is married to Collea McKinney and they have a two year old son, Anton Jr.



Angelo Thomas, M.S.
Assistant Professor of Education
Director-Teacher Education Laboratory
Reynolds Library, Second Floor
(501) 370-5282


Angelo Thomas, a recognized educator, scholar, and accomplished painter/artist, is a 1984 graduate of Southern Arkansas University-Magnolia, where he received his Bachelor of Science degree in Art Education with a minor in Library Science. He graduated in 1979 from Emerson High School in Emerson, Arkansas and was a participant in the Upward Bound program at Southern Arkansas University-Magnolia from 1977-79.  He is also a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

 

After teaching at various public schools in the state from 1984-1990 (Mount Holly, Emerson, and Taylor), he received the U.S. Department of Education’s Library Fellowship Grant for Minorities in 1990 to attend the University of Central Arkansas as a graduate student.  He graduated in August 1991 with a Master of Science degree in Library Media/Instructional Technology.  He has been the Director of the Teacher Education Laboratory at Philander Smith College since 1991.  His professional memberships include ISTE (International Society of Technology in Education), NEA (National Education Association), and ALA (American Library Association). 

His areas of interest in research include library research (non-print and print media usage by African-Americans and minorities), trends in instructional media/educational technology in the 21st century, database managment, old master's painting techniques/media for African-American and minority artists, and apprenticeship/mentoring current and future African-American and minority artists. 

He has worked with local civic organizations, businesses, and charities including the Angels of Mercy, Arkansas Homeless Coalition, Multicultural/Diversity in the Arts Committee for the city of Little Rock, Lion's Club, Starving Artist’s Café, and the Little Rock Small Business Incubator Department.  He has also worked as a librarian at Agape College in Little Rock and as an Adjunct Professor at Shorter College and Arkansas Baptist College.


An accomplished artist, Mr. Thomas has been seriously painting since 1995. His recent art exhibitions include one-man shows at Philander Smith College and Southern Arkansas University-Magnolia. Also, he is one of 40 showcased regional artists at the Arkansas Institute of Learning (located on Clinton Avenue in the Little Rock River-Market area).

Mr. Thomas has shown many of his works in galleries and exhibitions in Arkansas and Louisiana. An online gallery of his highly creative artworks can be seen at http://fineartamerica.com and www.gallery-worldwide.com .  He can be reached at athomas@philander.edu

Donna Collins

Administrative Assistant
Suite C, Front Desk
(501) 370-5248


Ms. Collins has served as Administrative Assistant for the Division of Education since 2004. 

She has been actively involved in the successful completion of NCATE (National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education) as well as the Early Childhood Education SPA reports and approval of the Middle Level Education program.  She enjoys assisting students and helping them to set goals for passing the PRAXIS exams and completing the Teacher Education program. 

Ms. Collins holds a bachelor's degree in social science from Portland State University in Portland, Oregon.  Also, she has a background in market research and surveys where she has done everything from interviewing to focus group moderation.

Accreditation

Philander Smith College is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central
Association of Colleges and Schools to award baccalaureate degrees. The organization can be
reached at http://hlcommission.com/


Acceptance to the Teacher Education Program

Acceptance into the Teacher Education Pro gram (as a candidate) is based on the following criteria:

1. *Education majors m ust complete all general ed u cation course req uirements and earn grades of “C” or better in ENG 113 English Composition I, ENG 123 English Composition II, ENG 103 Basic Speech, and MTH 133 College Algebra; (*ECED majors have special provisions for HIST 103 Arkansas History, PHRE 203 Ethics and Society, and POSC 203 American National Government);
2. Education majors m ust file a Declaration of Major Form in the Registrar’s  office and the Division of Education.
3. Education majors m ust meet with their assigned advisor to confirm a course
 of study;

  *Education majors must pass EDUC 203 Introduction to Education and SPED 213 The Exceptional Learner with   a grade of “C” or better and complete a minimum of  30 clock ho urs of Level I Field Experie nce in an approved ed u cation settin g; (MCEA majors are not requires to take SPED 213 The Exceptional Learner);

4. Education majors m ust pass PRAXIS I/Comp uteri zed Pre-Professional S kills  Test (CPPST);
5. Education majors m ust pass an admission to the Division of Education
 Interview and obtain a minimum rating of “acceptable”;
6. Education majors must f ulfill all above criteria before ta king ECED, MCEA, and VOBT courses;

7. Education majors must be a member of Student Arkansas Education Association (SAEA);

8. Education majors who wish to become candida tes mu st take the Ri sing Junior Test (MAAP).

 

Retenti on in the Teacher Education Pr ogram

Retention in the Division of Education as a candidate is based on the following criteria:

 

1. Advisors and candidates will conference d uring initial e nrollment in order to confirm the candidate’s course of   st ud y, and to determine the candidate’s GPA from the preceding semester. The point of reference will be the candidate’s Degree Audit.

2. Candidates must maintain a minimum GPA of 2.50 in all courses with a grade of “C” or better in all professional and content courses. A ny courses in which the candidate ear ns a grade lower than a “C” must be repeated.

3. Candidates having a GPA of less than 2.50 or a grade lower than a “C” in all p rofessional and/or content courses will be placed on probationary stat us with the Division and given the benefit of advising to help meet Division retention requirements;

4. Candidates having a GPA less than 2.50 or a grade l ower than a “C” in any pro fessional, and/or content course for more than one semester will be administratively withdrawn from the pro gram.

5. Candidates must take the Rising Junior Test (MAAP).

Admission to Directed Teaching

Admission to Directed Teaching is based on the following criteria:

 

1. Candidates must apply for Directed Teaching t hrough their major advisor by March 15 to enroll in directed teaching in the Fall Semester, and by October 15 to enroll in Directed Teach ing in the Spring Semester;

2. Candidates must be recommended to the Tea cher Education Committee by their major advisor;

3. Candidates must submit a professional portfolio for review by the Teacher Education Committee prior to the  interview ( Guidelines for preparing the portfolio are o utlined in the Level I Field Experience Handboo k);

4. Candidates mu st have a minimum c umulative GPA of 2.50 in the appropriate Teacher Education Program,  with no grade less than “C” in any professional and/or content course;

5. Candidates must have no more than 18 hours to com plete in the major (Directed teaching, plus 3  course ho urs);

6. Candidates mu st be interviewed by members of the Tea cher Ed u cation Committee and obtain a minimum  rating of “acceptable”;

7. Candidates must pass PRAXIS II (Content) pri or to applying f or  Directed Teachin g ;
8. Candidates must complete a criminal b a ckground che ck and a Tuber culo sis te st;

9. Candidates must be a member of Stude nt Ar kansas Education Association (SAEA).

 

Exit Pr o cedures (Graduation)

Exiting the Teacher Education Program is based on the following criteria:

 

1. Candidates m ust have completed all General Education and major requirements with a minimum 2.50 GPA;

2. Candidates must have completed all Professional a nd Content area courses with a minimum 2.50 GPA;

3. Candidates m ust have completed 22 of the last 32 semester ho urs at Philander Smith Colle ge;

4. Candidates m ust have met all Colle ge req uirements, incl udi ng attaining at lea st the minimum pa ssing scores on the  PRAXIS II: Principles of Learning and T eaching and the appropriate Content area assessment;

5. Candidates m ust have completed a written application for graduation by the deadline date as set forth by the   Re gistrar’s Office and stated in the Philander Smith Colle ge Catalo g;
6. Candidates must have obtained approval for graduation from the Division Chairperson and major advisor;

7. Candidates m ust pass an Exit Interview by members of the Teacher Education Committee and obtain a minimum rating of “acceptable”;

8. Candidates must have obtained a minimum rating of “acceptable” on his or her professional portfolio.

 

LICENSURE PROGRAMS

 

Early Childho od Education (P-4)

Early childhood is the period of h uman development from birth to a ge eight. D uring this ti me, they have distinct ph y sical, social, emotional, and intell ect ual needs. Recent evidence from medical science, psy cholog y, and other areas has confirmed that this period is a critical t ime in h uman development. The Early Childhood Education Program is de signed to prepare teachers of young children from birth to age eight, in early grades pre-kindergarten to 4 th grade, in both self-contained and departmentalized classrooms. The teacher emerging from an Early Childhood Education Pro gram will be the force in the teachin g/learning p rocess with an understanding of h uman growth and development, a repertoire of effective teaching strateg ies appropriate for young children, knowledge of the reform movement, and the capacity to imple ment developmentally appropriate, int egrative, and interdisciplinary early childhood c urric ul um.  Key components and goals of the program that bind the courses together to achieve the philosophy and purpose are: 

1. An in-depth st udy of yo ung children’s development and the implications for Early Childhood Education Teachers;

2. Professional, content, and technolo gy courses designed e xcl u sively for prospective Early Childhood Education Teachers;

3. Inte grated content courses designed and t eam-ta ught so st udents ta ke content area co urses (e. g.   En glish) while sim ultaneo u sly ta king content co urses to learn how to teach that content to early childhood   students;

4. Internships ta ken concurrently with the content courses provide a s trong emphasis in this pro gram.

The Early Childhood Education Pro gram at Philander Smith Colle ge p rovides numerous and varied opportunities for teacher candidates to apply their knowledge of the developmental needs and characteristics of yo ung children to their own beliefs about the teaching and learning p rocess.  In order to become an effective teacher, one m ust not only have knowledge of teachin g, b ut also be able to ta ke knowledge and develop a belief s ystem which he/she can act upon.

 

Middle Level Education (Generalist) (MCEA)

Middle Level is the period of h uman development experienced in children from the a ges 9-14. During this time, they have distinct ph y sical, soc ial, emotional, and intellect ual needs.  Recent evidence from medical science, ps y cholo gy, and other areas has confirmed that this period is a critical ti me in h uman development.   It is a time when dramatic cha n ges occur in appearance, self-co ncept, and intellect ual development. The Middle   Level Education Generalist Pro gram is designed to prepare teachers of young adolescents (ages 9 to 14) in middle   grades 4-8 in both self -contained and departmentalized classrooms.  The teacher eme rging from a Middle Level Education Generalist Program will be a reflective pract itioner with an understanding of h uman growth and development, a repertoire of effective teaching strateg ies appropriate for young adolescents, knowledge of the middle level reform movement, and the capa city to implement developmentally app ropriate, integrative and interdisciplinary middle level c urric ul um. Key components of the program include:

  1. An in-depth st udy of middle chil dhood/early adolescent development and the implications for middle  childhood/early adolescence c urric ul um;  

2. Professional, content and technolo gy courses designed e xcl u sively for prospective middle level generalist teachers;

3. Inte grated content courses designed and t eam-ta ught so candidates ta ke content area courses (e. g.   En glish) while sim ultaneo u sly ta king content cou rses to learn how to teach that content to middle   level st udents;  

4. Internships ta ken concurrently with the content courses provide a s trong emphasis in this pro gram.

 

The Middle Level Education Generalist Pro gram at Philander Smith Colle ge provides n umero us and varied opport unities for candidates to apply their knowledge of the developmental needs a nd characteristics of middle childhood and young adolescents to their own beliefs about the teaching and learning process.  In order to become an effective teacher, one must not only have knowled ge of teaching, but also be able to take knowledge and develop a belief system upon which he/she can act.

 

Vocational Education/Business Technology (VOBT)

The main purpose of the major in Vocational Education/Business Technology (VOBT) program is to prepare highly    qualified teachers of vocational education/business technology for grades seven through twelve. The degree also qualifies the graduate for employment in business and/or graduate studies. All candidates interested in pursuing a Vocational Education/Business Technology degree and teacher licensure must meet Philander Smith College graduation and Arkansas Teacher Licensure requirements. Key components of the program include:

 

1. An in-depth study of young children’s development and the implications for vocational education/business technology teachers;

2. Professional, content, and technology courses designed exclusively for prospective vocational education/business technology teachers:

3. Integrated content courses designed and team-taught so candidates take content area courses (e.g. vocational education/business technology) while simultaneously taking content courses to learn how to teach that content to vocational education/business technology students;

4. Internships taken concurrently with the content courses provide a strong emphasis on this program.

 

The Vocational Education/Business Technology Program at Philander Smith College Provides numerous and varied opportunities for candidates to apply their knowledge of the developmental needs and characteristics of adolescents (grades 7-12) to their own beliefs about the teaching and learning process. In order to become an effective teacher, one must not only have knowledge of teaching, but also be able to take knowledge and develop a belief system upon which he/she can act.

 

NON-LICENSURE PROGRAM

The Division of Education offers a non-teaching degree in Ph y sical Education.

 

Physical Education (N on-Licensure)

The Physical Education non-teaching de gree is gro unded in a broad liberal a rts program designed to provide the candidates with opportunities to explore varied career opportunities. Course content in the non-teaching degree program offers candidates information needed to make informed decisions abo ut a professional career. Ph y sical Education majors who wish to p urs ue a de gree in the p rogram mu st meet the following entry level req uirements:

 

1. Pass all General Education courses with a grade point average of 2.00 or better;

2. Pass ENG 113 English Composition, ENG 123 English Composition II, ENG 103 Basic Speech, MTH 133 College   Algebra, EDUC 100X Level I Field Experience, E DUC 203 Introduction to Ed ucation and SPED 213 The   Exceptional Learner with a grade of C” or better.  

Retenti on in Physical Education

The requirements for retention in the Physical Education Program:

 

1. S uccessfully participate in the course of st ud y, all prescribed wor kshops, seminars, s ymposium s, field   experiences within the Physical Ed ucation (non-teachin g) c urric ul um;  
  2. Maintain a GPA of 2.00 or more in the content and professional c urric ul um;

3. S uccessfully f ulfill all req uirements.

Exit Pr o cedures (Graduati on) Ph ysical Education (N on-Licensure)


Requirements for Admission for Graduation: Majors in the Physical Education Program   mu s t:

1. Complete all major req uirements with an overall grade point of 2.00 or better.

2. Complete all Content and Professional course requirements with a grade of C” or better.

3. Complete a written application for graduation by the d eadline date as set forth by the Office of the Registrar  and stated in the c urrent Philander Smith Colle ge Catalo g.

4. Obtain approval for graduation from t he Division Chairperson and major advisor.
5. Take the Graduate Record Examination (GRE)

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (2009-2011 CATALOG)

 

ART 303. Art for Young Children.

A study of arts and crafts designed especially to meet the needs of the early childhood school teacher.

 

Early Childhood Education (ECED)

 

ECED 311. Praxis II: Content Knowledge.

The purpose of this course is to provide structured support to early childhood level candidates as they prepare for successful completion of the Praxis II–Content Knowledge licensure assessment. Early childhood candidates will participate in review, analysis and synthesis of pertinent content knowledge they have obtained in the preparation program in subject areas that are considered central to early childhood teacher preparation.

 

ECED 333. Developmentally Appropriate Practices.

A study of developmentally appropriate practice for young children, birth through age 9. This course is an integrated curricular study of appropriate early childhood curriculum, materials, environments, assessments, expectations, instructional strategies, and considerations for early childhood educators. Candidates will build the competencies necessary to meet state licensure standards and NAEYC guidelines for appropriate practices.

 

ECED 353. Pre-Kindergarten Practicum.

This clinical experience provides candidates with a variety of preschool teaching experiences with young children ages 0-3. Candidates will spend one day each week for ten weeks (60 clock hours) experience in a pre-kindergarten classroom. They will be oriented to the structure of the school, the classroom setting, and various approaches to teaching, organizing instruction based on learning theory and developmentally appropriate activities and materials.

 

ECED 363. Guiding Young Children.

Emphasis is placed on the guidance and management of young children ages 3-9 years, individually and in groups. The course will focus on developmentally appropriate practices in multicultural setting which encourage the positive potential inherent in children to become self-regulated learners. Creation of context for positive discipline and building self-esteem and social competence will be explored. Different guidance models and strategies for handling difficult behaviors are presented.

 

ECED 373. Children’s Literature/Social Studies.

This course is designed to prepare candidates to teach children’s literature and social studies in pre-kindergarten through fourth grade. Candidates will be provided with varied opportunities to use knowledge and skills needed to effectively organize instruction. Emphasis on planning, teaching, and assessing children’s literature and social studies to meet the need of diverse learners.

 

ECED 401. Directed Teaching Seminar.

This course offers interdisciplinary faculty guided seminars designed to support candidates during directed teaching. Seminar topics address the knowledge, skills, and dispositions essential to the teaching/learning process.

 

ECED 411. Praxis II: Principles of Teaching and Learning.

The purpose of this seminar is to provide structured support to early childhood level candidates as they prepare for successful completion of the Praxis II–Principles of Learning and Teaching licensure requirement. Early childhood candidates will participate in review, analysis, and synthesis of pertinent pedagogical knowledge and learning theory they have obtained in the teacher preparation program in areas that are considered central to early childhood preparation such as assessment, classroom management and behavior guidance, and developmentally appropriate instructional strategies and environments.

.

ECED 417. Directed Teaching Pre-Kindergarten.

Directed teaching in pre-kindergarten deals with the application of theory to teaching situations in the pre-kindergarten classroom. The candidate begins by observation and participation and gradually assumes complete responsibility for the classroom. The candidate will use a broad array of approaches in teaching that will address exceptionalities and grouping procedures. They will also determine how to organize instruction based on knowledge of students’ learning theory and how to manage the learning environment. Candidates are expected to use technology throughout the teaching/learning process.

 

ECED 427. Directed Teaching Primary.

Directed teaching in primary deals with the application of theory to teaching situations in the primary classroom. The candidate begins by observation and participation and gradually assumes complete responsibility for the classroom. The candidate will use a broad array of approaches in teaching that will address exceptionalities and grouping procedures. They will also demonstrate how to organize instruction based on knowledge of students’ learning theory and how to manage the learning environment. Candidates are expected to use technology throughout the teaching/learning process.

                                                                                       

ECED 443. Primary Practicum (clinical experience).

This clinical experience will acquaint the candidates with primary school settings. Candidates will spend one day a week for ten weeks (60 clock hours) in a primary school classroom. The candidate will use a broad array of approaches in teaching that will address exceptionalities and grouping procedures. They will also demonstrate how to organize instruction based on knowledge of students’ learning theory and how to manage the learning. Candidates are expected to use technology throughout the teaching/learning process.

 

ECED 473. Integrated Math and Science for Young Children.

The course focuses on children’s mathematical and science learning pre-kindergarten through fourth grade. The student applies knowledge of child development to the child’s understanding and development of mathematics and science knowledge and skills. With NAEYC, NSES, and NCTM standards as guides, the student learns about math content, developmentally appropriate teaching strategies, materials, and integrated applications for early childhood classrooms. Students explore literacy linkages to mathematics and science as well as the use of technology, processes, and manipulatives to teach math and science content.

 

ECED 483. Children and Families in a Diverse Society.

A study of the characteristics of young children with developmental disabilities in the contexts of family theory and intervention. Particular emphasis will be places on how these characteristics impact the child’s family and educational needs. Parents as partners in education will be the focus of the course. Parent/teacher conferences, parent participation, and advocacy will be examined. Community agencies which support the development of children and families will be reviewed and resources identified on particular issues related to children and families. This course will explore the teacher’s role in embracing and supporting the range of diversity found in young children and their families.

 

ECED 493. Literacy/Language Arts.                                                                            

This course combines theory and practice in literacy instruction and the integration of children’s literature in pre-kindergarten through fourth grade. Major emphasis is on current research, methods, strategies, and assessment that are essential for implementing a balanced literacy and language arts program. This course addresses diversity in the classroom that includes, but not limited to, cognitive abilities, culture, English Language Learners (ELL), and socioeconomic background.

 

Middle Childhood/Early Adolescence (MCEA)

 

MCEA 311. Praxis II (Content).

The purpose of this course is to provide structured support to middle childhood level candidates as they prepare for successful completion of the Praxis II–Content Knowledge licensure assessment. Middle childhood candidates will participate in review, analysis, and synthesis of pertinent content knowledge they have obtained in the preparation program in subject areas that are considered central to middle childhood teacher preparation.

 

MCEA 333. Teaching Diverse Learners.

This course explores both the foundations of diversity and a variety of cultural groups while providing practical strategies and methodologies for shaping and implementing multicultural curriculum. The course will assist teacher candidates to identify various cultural groups in order to help them better understand the background and multiple needs of these diverse students. Primary foci for the course include planning a multicultural curriculum, using the most effective instructional strategies with diverse learners, working successfully with diverse learners, and collaborating with school personnel and administrators to order to implement an effective multicultural curriculum.

 

MCEA 343. Internship I (Grades 4-5)

Candidates will spend one day per week for ten weeks (60 clock hours) in a middle school classroom. This field experience will acquaint candidates with a variety of experiences in a middle school classroom. Candidates will be oriented to the structure of a school district, the school, and the classroom setting. All concurrent courses in the block will include assignments or specific tasks to be completed by candidates during the classroom placement in the clinical experience.

 

MCEA 353. Managing the Learning Environment.

The primary purpose of this course is to introduce candidates to the concepts of 1) organizing the learning environment, 2) promoting an optimal learning environment, 3) promoting student self-management, 4) developing strategies for managing behavior, and 5) promoting parental involvement. The course will prepare candidates to develop a philosophy about behavior management based on educational, psychological, and common sense principles. Candidates will examine effective strategies to prevent problems, deal with misbehavior problems without escalating situations, and to safely manage the out-of-control student.

 

MCEA 401. Directed Teaching Seminar.

This course offers interdisciplinary faculty-guided seminars designed to support candidates during directed teaching. Seminar topics address the knowledge, skills, and dispositions essential to the teaching/learning process.

 

MCEA 411. Praxis II: Principles of Teaching and Learning.

The purpose of this seminar is to provide structured support to middle childhood level candidates as they prepare for successful completion of the Praxis II–Principles of Learning and Teaching licensure assessment. Middle childhood candidates will participate in review, analysis and synthesis of pertinent pedagogical knowledge and learning theory they have obtained in the teacher preparation program in areas that are considered central to middle childhood preparation such as assessment, classroom management and behavior guidance, and developmentally appropriate instructional strategies and environments.

 

MCEA 417. Directed Teaching I (Middle Childhood).

Directed teaching in middle childhood deals with the application of theory to teaching situations in the middle childhood classroom. The candidate will use a broad array of approaches in teaching that will address exceptionalities and grouping procedures. They will also demonstrate how to organize instruction based on knowledge of students’ learning theory and how to manage the learning environment. Candidates are expected to use technology throughout the teaching/learning process.

 

MCEA 427. Directed Teaching II (Early Adolescence).

Directed teaching in the middle level classroom deals with the application of theory to teaching situations in early adolescence language arts/social studies. The candidate begins by observation and participation and gradually assumes complete responsibility for the classroom. The candidate will use a broad array of approaches in teaching that will address exceptionalities and grouping procedures. They will also demonstrate how to organize instruction based on knowledge of students’ learning theory and how to manage the learning environment. Candidates are expected to use technology throughout the teaching/learning process.

 

MCEA 433. Internship II (Grades 6-8 Clinical Experience).

Candidates will spend time one day a week for ten weeks (60 clock hours) in an early adolescence Language Arts/Social Studies classroom. This clinical experience will focus on working with students in large and small groups. This clinical experience will acquaint the candidates with middle school settings. Candidates will spend one day a week for ten weeks (60 clock hours) in a middle level English/Language Arts/Social Studies or a Math/Science classroom. The candidate will use a broad array of approaches in teaching that will address exceptionalities and grouping procedures. They will also demonstrate how to organize instruction based on knowledge of students’ learning theory and how to manage the learning environment. Candidates are expected to use technology throughout the teaching/learning process.

 

MCEA 463. Middle Level Curriculum and Pedagogy.

This course is designed to prepare pre-service middle level teachers in planning and implementing effective and efficient models of middle school curricula. The candidate will examine curriculum integration, multidisciplinary planning, interdisciplinary curricula, and standards-based design. Candidates will also explore learning styles, multiple intelligences, and the impact developmental, cultural, ethnic, gender, and socioeconomic issues have on curricular planning and implementation at the middle level.

 

MCEA 473. Teaching Middle Level Science.

A professional course designed to investigate basic content, pedagogy, and the importance of science in middle level school curricula.

 

MCEA 483. Teaching Literacy at Middle Level.

This course will emphasize the development of reading in the content areas for middle level students. The focus of this course will expand upon the concepts of developing meaningful literary experiences for middle childhood/early adolescence students. There is a continued focus on language and literature as an integral part of the curriculum. This course involves a study of major theories and current teaching strategies in literacy for middle childhood/early adolescents. Evaluation and assessment strategies will be explored.

 

MCEA 493. English/Language Arts/Social Studies.

In this course, candidates will learn how a middle-level English/language arts/social studies teacher creates a learning environment in which middle level students thrive as readers, writers, thinkers, citizens, individuals, and members of an extraordinary classroom community. Course content provides organizational techniques, ways of using life experiences and literature to immerse candidates in meaningful writing, reading, and evaluation techniques that focus on process as well as product. The integration of knowledge will be studied with specific emphasis on connecting the English, language arts, and social studies domains. Candidates will learn to incorporate techniques such as active research, technology, collaborative planning with students, issue-based curriculum, use of student concerns, and authentic assessment through the lens of integration of major themes in the areas of English, language arts, and social studies.

 

Music Education

 

MED 313. Music Education.

An introductory course in music that is designed for non-music majors. The course focuses upon music in education and offers experiences designed for successful music learning and teaching. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Offered on demand.

 

Physical Education

 

PHED 102. Bowling & Golf For Physical Education Majors.

An activity course designed to teach the fundamentals of these sports. One lecture and one laboratory session per week.

 

PHED 111. Physical Fitness.

Warm up exercises; develop proficiency in conditioning exercise, marching, isometrics, self-testing, rough games, soccer, and volleyball.

 

PHED 112. Mental, Personal, and Community Health.

This course covers information on mental problems common to daily life, to inform students of the personal and community health problems that will debilitate health and to teach the whats, hows, and whys of good health habits—lectures, visual aids, and discussions.

 

PHED 113. Theory and Practice of Basketball.

Fundamental skills and techniques in basketball practice. Students will acquire knowledge of the history and development of basketball as a team sport.

 

PHED 121. Physical Education—Motor Skills.

Skills, strategies, and drills in fundamentals of basketball—4 lessons: track & field, softball, tumbling stunts, trampoline, bars, heavy apparatus—demonstration to be given at the end of the term.

 

PHED 122. First Aid & Safety Education.

The skills and techniques that are useful for personal relief and assistance to the injured or ill until medical aid is given, safety for personal, group living for the home, industry, school, traffic, and pedestrian safety education.

 

PHED 123. History and Principles of Physical Education.

Will introduce students to the history, philosophy, and overall foundations of the Physical Education profession. Emphasis will also be placed on current issues or trends in the field of Physical Education.

 

PHED 132. Concepts of Wellness in Physical Education.

A course designed to give the students concise and factual information relative to the hows, whats, and whys of physical activities and major health and wellness concepts.

 

PHED 142. Beginning Bowling.

An activity course designed to teach the fundamentals of bowling. One lecture and one laboratory per week.

 

PHED 152. Beginning Golf.

An activity course designed to teach the fundamentals of golf. One lecture and one laboratory per week.

 

PHED 162. Beginning Tennis.

An activity course designed to teach the fundamentals of tennis. One lecture and one laboratory per week.

 

PHED 202. Fundamentals of Tennis.

Skills, rules, techniques, and terminology of tennis.

 

PHED 203. Theory and Practice of Baseball.

Fundamental skills and techniques in the practice of baseball. Students will acquire knowledge of the history and development of baseball as a team sport in the United States.

 

PHED 212. Theory and Practice of Racquetball.

Fundamental skills and techniques in racquetball practice. Students will acquire knowledge and skills in playing racquetball.

 

PHED 213. Theory and Practice of Volleyball.

Fundamental skills and techniques in volleyball practice. Students will acquire knowledge of the history and development of volleyball as a team sport.

 

PHED 223. Adapted and Corrective Physical Education.

This course is designed to acquaint students with the principles, techniques, and philosophy pertinent to assisting individuals in adapting to their specific physical conditions. Students will also examine content for adapting the teaching of physical activities for exceptional individuals.

 

PHED 233. Theory and Practice of Football.

Fundamental skills and techniques in football. Students will acquire knowledge of the history and development of football.

 

PHED 243. Nature and Needs of Motor Skills and Pattern Development.

This course provides students with a systematic study of motor skill and pattern development in people from birth to old age.

 

PHED 273. Gymnastics, Rhythmic Activities, and Lead-Up Games.

Designed to provide theory and practice through warm-up exercises, stunts, self-testing activities, the use of heavy apparatus, tumbling, and trampolining exhibition.

 

PHED 283. Community Recreation and Park Management.

This course is a study of the organization and administration of recreational activities for parks, playgrounds, community centers, and other recreation and park activities. Students will examine finance, promotion, staff relationships, areas and facilities, programming, and the scope and significance of community and park recreation programs.

 

PHED 303. Content and Materials of Physical Education.

This course is designed for the pre-service physical education teacher candidate to learn and demonstrate content, procedures, and technology utilized in teaching in a global society, in a culturally diverse society, in a culturally diverse environment, as well as in the exceptional environment.

 

PHED 312. Theory and Practice of Badminton and Archery.

Designed to provide the fundamental knowledge, skill, and practice of badminton and archery.

 

PHED 313. Applied Anatomy and Kinesiology.

This course is a study of the human body’s structure, skeletal system, joints, and muscular system as they apply to physical activity. Students will study the relationship of these systems to the teaching and participation in all levels of physical activities.

 

PHED 323. Physiology of Exercise.

The study of changes which accompany muscular activity. Emphasis is given to the fatigue cycle, physical fitness, the chronic effects of exercise and training content. Required for licensure. Prerequisite: PHED 313 Anatomy and Kinesiology.

 

PHED 333. Physical Education for Teacher Licensure Candidates.

A study of the characteristics of elementary school age children with implications for physical education. Learners will explore program content, material, and teaching techniques. A ten hour field experience is required for Early Childhood and Middle Childhood/Early Adolescence Education majors.

 

PHED 343. Theory and Practice of Track and Field.

Fundamental techniques, rules, regulations, and practice of track and field.

 

PHED 353. Fundamentals of Modern Dance.

The focus is on basic knowledge, skills, and techniques of modern dance and basic rhythm. The social and physical benefits of elementary and contemporary dance patterns will be explored.

 

PHED 403. Evaluation and Assessment in Physical Education.

This course is designed to provide students with a study of norm- and criterion-referenced tests. Standardized and teacher-made assessment devices and content of selecting, administering, and interpreting tests in the field of physical education. Students will utilize test results in developing lessons for individual students.

 

PHED 413. Organization and Administration of Physical Education.

Students will gain an overview of organizational patterns, policies, administrative processes, and problems confronting those who administer physical education, recreation, and athletic programs. Students will have simulated or actual experiences in program planning, scheduling, purchasing, maintenance of equipment, and public relations activities. A study of current research on administration and staff relations will be covered.

 

PHED 433. Coaching and Officiating.

Football, basketball, track, and field fundamentals, strategy in the coaching of different systems, treatment of athletic injuries, and techniques in officiating. The students must stage intramural activities on campus as well as coach and officiate games.

 

PHED 463. Recreation Leadership & Laboratory Experience.

A course designed to explore the theories, techniques, and recurrent problems of leadership in recreation; and the role of leadership in planning, organizing, and conducting recreation programs.

 

Pr ofessional Education

 

EDUC 100X. Level I Field Experience.

Designed to provide candidate, before admission to the teacher education program, the opportunity to observe and become involved on a limited basis, with teachers and students in a school setting. Concurrent enrollment in EDUC 203 Introduction to Education is required. 30 clock hours of observation and the development of a portfolio that journals their experiences are requirements of the Level I Field Experience.

 

EDUC 203. Introduction to Education.

A survey course of the history, philosophy, organization, and administration of schools in the United States. The course also includes: principles of learning, multi-cultural education, and materials of instruction. This course must be taken concurrently with EDUC 100X Level I Field Experience.

 

EDUC 303. Assessment.

This course includes the study of formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and to ensure the continuing intellectual, social, and physical development of students. The use of assessment technologies (e.g., observation, portfolios, teacher-designed tests, performance tests, projects, student self-assessment, peer assessment, and standardized tests) to enhance knowledge of individual learners, evaluate students’ progress and performance, and modify teaching and learning strategies; and to collaborate with specialists to accommodate the needs of students with exceptionalities will be stressed.

 

EDUC 313. Introduction to Mathematics Education.

In this course, candidates become acquainted with the basic theories, research, and principles underlying the math curriculum for early childhood. Consideration will be given to the development of students’ understanding of mathematical concepts and skills appropriate for the early childhood curriculum, as well as the appropriate use of manipulatives and hands-on experiences for young children.

 

EDUC 323. Instructional Media and Technology.

This course introduces the student to the concepts of instructional technology, communication, instructional design, and visual literacy. Emphasis will be placed on the application of an instructional design model to the study of a wide variety of instructional media.

 

EDUC 343. Child Development.

This course is the study of environmental and hereditary effects on the cognitive, affective, psychomotor and sociolinguistic development of typically and atypically developing children from conception to 4 th grade. The candidates will be introduced to strategies to observe and evaluate children’s development and recognize possible delays in development. Practical application of theory is provided through a variety of hands-on experiences and observation.

 

EDUC 353. Educational Psychology.

Psychological theories and principles that govern education in the United States will be studies by students in this course. A survey and analysis of developmental and learning theories and how they apply to the teaching-learning process will be examined.

 

EDUC 363. Foundations of Early Childhood Education.

An introduction to the early childhood profession including historical and social foundations, awareness of relevant issues and trends, ethical and legal issues, programming, staff relations, and the importance of becoming an advocate and resource for children and families. This course will explore the history, philosophy, and theories related to quality early childhood education.

 

EDUC 373. Foundations of Literacy.

Candidates in this course will gain an understanding of literacy development for birth through early adolescence. Emphasis is placed on theories about the reading process, concepts of print, principles that have been developed over the last three decades, ways to provide a literate environment as well as various approaches for literacy teaching and learning.

 

Special Education

 

SPED 213. The Exceptional Learner.

An introductory course presenting the philosophy, practices, and issues related to the field of special education. Concurrent enrollment in EDUC 203 Introduction to Education is required.

 

SPED 373. Multidisciplinary Approach to Teaching Mildly Handicapped Learners .

This course is designed to examine the rationale for using a team approach to prescribing and developing individualized ed u cation pro grams for mildly handicapped learners. The role of team membe rs will be e xplored. Practical application is req uired in the ten (10) hours field experience.

 

SPED 413. Content and Materials for Tea ching the Mildly Handicapped Learne r .

This course is designed to offer the candidates an opportunity to develop materials and practice content based upon theories and principles of effective instr uction the mildly handicapped learner. Candidates will develop a broad array of approaches to  teaching that will address e xceptionalities. 

 

 SPED 423. Methods and Materials for Persons with Mild Disabilities.

This course is designed to offer the candidates an opportunity to develop materials and practice content based upon theories and principles of effective instruction for persons with mild disabilities. Candidates will develop a broad array of approaches to teaching that will address exceptionalities.

 

 

Vocational Education/Business Technology

 

VOBT 311. Praxis II (Content).

The purpose of this course is to provide structured support to vocational education/business technology level candidates as they prepare for successful completion of the Praxis II–Content Knowledge licensure assessment. Vocational education/business technology candidates will participate in review, analysis and synthesis of pertinent content knowledge they have obtained in the preparation program in subject areas that are considered central to vocational education/business technology teacher preparation.

 

VOBT 343. Internship I.

Students will spend two days per week in a middle/junior high and/or senior high school classroom. This field experience will acquaint candidate with a variety of middle/junior and senior high experiences in a middle/junior and senior high classroom. Students will be oriented to the structure of a school district, the school, and the classroom setting. All concurrent courses in the block will include assignments or specific tasks to be completed by candidates during the classroom placement in this field experience.

 

VOBT 353. Methods and Instructional Materials in Vocational Business Technology.

This course is designed to prepare business teachers for the task of teaching economics education, basic business, marketing and vocational business technology. The course centers on the discussion and microteaching. Emphasis is placed on behavioral objectives, group and self-instructional methods and materials, course outlines, and evaluations. The course involves the study of the curriculum and methods common to the business and vocational business programs and research behind its development. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education.

 

VOBT 363. Foundations of Vocational Business Technology.

This course emphasizes historical, economic, sociological, political, and psychological foundations of vocational and business education technology. The course focuses on basic business, vocational business and vocational marketing, and the forces, including legislation, that shape instruction and curriculum developments in these areas.

 

VOBT 401. Directed Teaching Seminar.

An inter-disciplinary faculty-guided seminar designed to support student teachers during their student teaching experiences. Seminar topics are designed to address the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions relevant to the systematic planning, effective communication, instructional leadership, and professional development.

 

VOBT 403. Administrative Office Information Systems.

This course centers on administration of office functions, the role of information processing, information processing concepts and careers, information processing skills (basic and advanced), and systems for information processing.

 

VOBT 411. Praxis II: Principles of Teaching and Learning.

The purpose of this seminar is to provide structured support to vocational education/business technology level candidates as they prepare for successful completion of the Praxis II–Principles of Learning and Teaching licensure assessment. Vocational education/business technology candidates will participate in review, analysis, and synthesis of pertinent pedagogical knowledge and learning theory they have obtained in the teacher preparation program in areas that are considered central to vocational education/business technology preparation such as assessment, classroom management and behavior guidance, and developmentally appropriate instructional strategies and environments.

 

VOBT 413. Organization and Administration of Vocational Cooperative Education.

This course is a detailed study of the program structure and composition of vocational education program areas (business technology, marketing, trade and industrial education, etc.). It examines the principles and procedures for initiating and teaching cooperative vocational and business technology programs, including the development of cooperative education and relationships with business, industry, and other institutions.

 

VOBT 417. Directed Teaching—Middle School/Junior High.

This course deals with the application of theory to teaching situations in middle school/junior high facilities and schools. The candidate begins by observation and participation and gradually assumes complete responsibility for the classroom. The candidate will plan, teach, and reflect on the experience. The candidate will prepare for children with special needs. He/she is expected to use all the resources of the school and to exhibit competence with technology.

 

VOBT 427. Directed Teaching—Senior High.

This course deals with the application of theory to teaching situations in senior high facilities and schools. The candidate begins by observation and participation and gradually assumes complete responsibility of the classroom. The candidate will prepare for children with special needs. He/she is expected to use available resources of the school and exhibit competence with technology.

 

VOBT 443. Internship II.

Students will spend two days per week in a middle/junior and senior high school classroom working with students. This field experience will focus on working with students in large and small groups. Students will be expected to complete assignments related to their on-campus courses during the classroom placement. During this field placement, students will continue to develop their professional skills to their specialty area of education.

 



©